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The Library of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg / RUTH BADER GINSBURG'S ANNOTATED COPY OF THE 1957-58 HARVARD LAW REVIEW. Harvard Law Review, Volume 71. Cambridge, MA The Harvard Law Review Association, 1957, 1958.

The Evolution of a Justice
Lot 3
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RUTH BADER GINSBURG'S ANNOTATED COPY OF THE 1957-58 HARVARD LAW REVIEW.
Harvard Law Review, Volume 71. Cambridge, MA: The Harvard Law Review Association, 1957, 1958.
19 – 27 January 2022, 12:00 EST
New York

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RUTH BADER GINSBURG'S ANNOTATED COPY OF THE 1957-58 HARVARD LAW REVIEW.

Harvard Law Review, Volume 71. Cambridge, MA: The Harvard Law Review Association, 1957, 1958. Tall 8vo. Original red cloth, black label to spine, spine lettered in gilt.
Provenance: "Ruth B. Ginsburg" lettered to spine; bookplate "From the Library of Martin & Ruth Ginsburg" to front pastedown.

GINSBURG'S PERSONAL COPY, ANNOTATED.
Ginsburg joined the Harvard Law Review in her second year, one of only two women on staff that year. Under the leadership of Richard N. Goodwin (1931-2018, speechwriter and special counsel to John F. Kennedy, later special assistant to Lyndon B. Johnson), the Review published works by Archibald Cox, Alexander Bickel, and Benjamin Kaplan, among others. The year Ginsburg spent on the Harvard Law Review was also the year her husband Martin was diagnosed with cancer and underwent two surgeries and radiation therapy, making the excellence of her work that much more impressive.

This volume is Ginsburg's personal copy of the Harvard Law Review publications in which she participated. Her annotations are particularly heavy in two sections: the first is an essay titled "Problems of Parallel State and Federal Remedies" (pp 513-526), the third article in the "review" section of Vol 71, number 4. In the sub-chapter, "Suit in a Federal Court," Ginsburg has heavily underscored text relating to Hurn v. Oursler, a 1933 case outlining what conditions govern the use of the doctrine of pendent jurisdiction. The other heavily annotated article in this volume is "Price-Restrictive Patent Licenses Under the Sherman Act" by Helmut F. Furth (pp 815-842); Ginsburg underscores and annotates Furth's history of the price-fixing patent and the court's regulation of the same.

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