News

Bonhams Magazine

Issue 44, Autumn 2015

Page 75

News

Bonhams Magazine

Issue 44, Autumn 2015

Page 75

News

Bonhams Magazine

Issue 44, Autumn 2015

Page 75

News

Bonhams Magazine

Issue 44, Autumn 2015

Page 75

News

Bonhams Magazine

Issue 44, Autumn 2015

Page 75

News

Bonhams Magazine

Issue 44, Autumn 2015

Page 75

News

Bonhams Magazine

Issue 44, Autumn 2015

Page 75

News

Bonhams Magazine

Issue 44, Autumn 2015

Page 75

News

Bonhams Magazine

Issue 44, Autumn 2015

Page 75

News

Bonhams Magazine

Issue 44, Autumn 2015

Page 75

In and out of Bonhams' salerooms:

Prince of Denmark

Danish car enthusiast, Henrik Frederiksen, is offering his collection of 48 rare motor cars for sale with Bonhams in a single-owner sale, The Frederiksen Auction, on 26 September. The sale takes place at Frederiksen's residence at Lyngsbækgaard, a 16th-century manor house in a national park, built for the Danish royal family. The cars have been meticulously looked after on the grounds for years. "Cars are a kind of art," declared Frederiksen. "I think they're beautiful." The sale features predominantly pre-war motor cars from marques including Rolls-Royce, Bentley and Maybach. One car on offer, the Maybach Zeppelin, is an exemplary model of German pre-war craftsmanship, presented as a gift from the Reichsmacht to the Maharajah of Patiala.

Enquiries: Jakob Greisen +1 (415) 503 3284 jakob.greisen@bonhams.com

On the field of valour

Waterloo Uncovered is an exciting new charity that combines ground-breaking archeology with veteran care and recovery. On 21 September, Bonhams is hosting a panel discussion, chaired by Jeremy Paxman, below right, and featuring historians, army veterans and archeologists, to explore the history and interpretations of the battle and introduce the work of the charity. Tickets are available for a suggested donation of £50. All proceeds from the evening will go towards Waterloo Uncovered's future work, which provides a unique opportunity for veterans to participate in an important dig, as well as supporting their recovery.

For more information, please contact
info@waterloouncovered.com

'Evans above

"Oh you pretty Chitty Bang Bang, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, we love you..." sing the lyrics to one of the best-loved children's movies of all time, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. Unusually, the film's star was a flying motor car. In September, a spectacular replica Chitty is included in Bonhams Goodwood Revival sale as one of 12 cars owned by Top Gear presenter Chris Evans, who also has six Ferraris in the auction. Complete with polished aluminum bonnet, leather seats, wooden body, and broad red and yellow wings, the car's designers faithfully kept to the original model. After Evans purchased the car,
he made it road legal, so it can at least fly along the highway.

Enquiries: Sholto Gilbertson
+44 (0) 20 7468 5809
sholto.gilbertson@bonhams.com

Hen do

In April, Bonhams' A Century of Iraqi Art, the first-ever sale dedicated to modern Iraqi art, shone a spotlight on the masters of the Baghdad Modern Group. The sale was a considerable success for head of Modern and Contemporary Middle Eastern Art, Nima Sagharchi. He hopes that "bringing together some of the most important works from this period will lead to the emergence of a new perspective on the contemporary cultural history in Iraq". The top lot in April's sale was Shakir Al-Said's Cubist Cockerel which sold for £194,000. This October in Part II of the sale, Jewad Selim's The Hen Seller (estimated at £300,000 - 500,000) takes on the fowl motif. The hen, a subject of ancient Arab artifacts and a traditional symbol of rural plenty, was a way in which the Group could "solve the [artistic] identity problem in our contemporary awakening by following the footsteps of the 13th century [Iraqi] painters". Painted in 1951 at the height of his folk modernist style, the lighthearted and boisterous picture revels in the rich aesthetic of the Baghdad street.

Enquiries: Nima Sagharchi +44 (0) 20 7468 8342
nima.sagharchi@bonhams.com

Asian Art Week in New York

During New York Asian Art Week from 15 to 18 September, Bonhams' highlights include a statue from Gandhara in the Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art sale. This embodies the hybrid style that emerged when Alexander the Great reached the Buddhist civilisation of Gandhara in 327BC. The Greek aesthetic of the perfect body and the Buddhist conception of a perfect mind meet in this stone Maitreya. An embellished silk 'dragon robe' in the Chinese Paintings and Works of Art sale, right, illustrates the importance that the Qing dynasty placed on marrying Chinese traditions with their own Manchu heritage. The robe, its shape based on a traditional nomadic riding costume, is decorated with cranes, a symbol of longevity. Its rare olive-brown silk material was reserved for members of the Imperial family, suggesting that it was worn to celebrate a birthday. Another official costume is a piece of Edo armor at the Fine Japanese Works of Art sale. This armor is adorned with the crest of its original owner, Viscount Yamaguchi Izumi no Kami Hirokuni. He was lord of Ushiku Castle from 1829 to 1839, before he embraced the life of an ascetic, living as a monk until his death.

Enquiries:
asian.us@bonhams.com

Glass from the past

Bohemia's spa towns became social hotspots in the early 19th century, as Europe's aristocrats descended each 'season' for vigorous hunting, followed by a healing spa session (a messy mud bath at Franzensbad was supposed to be excellent for gout). The region's glassmakers, heirs to an age-old industry, responded enthusiastically, as demonstrated in September's Part II of Bonhams Masterpieces of Bohemian Glass sale, the contents of an outstanding private collection. Hunt winners were awarded glass trophies featuring traditional hunting scenes, engraved using Tiefschnitt, the carving away of glass to create intaglio reliefs. Prominent glass artist August Böhm died in penury, but his work is now highly prized.

Enquiries: John Sandon +44 (0) 20 7468 8244
john.sandon@bonhams.com

Out of this world

Skulls have served as 'memento mori' since medieval times, famously in sumptuous 'Vanitas' scenes, the name at once a shorthand for the painting's didactic function – "all is vanity!" – and a commentary on the vanity of the memento itself. The symbol has been executed in ivory, rock crystal and diamond, but for his skull, artist Lee Downey looked to more exotic materials, sourcing a block of Gibeon, a rare meteorite rock found only in the asteroid belt zone in Namibia. The sculpture, titled Yorick, is offered in the sale of Lapidary Works of Art, Specimen Gemstones and Minerals at Bonhams Los Angeles on 24 November. Downey is based in Bali, where he has been learning his trade from master carvers for decades. He has made skulls from jet, wooly mammoth ivory, and bowling balls, but the skull, which is the largest-ever Gibeon sculpture, was his most ambitious choice to date. It had to be acid-etched to reveal the 'Widmanstätten pattern', Gibeon's unique geometric markings, not found in any material that comes from earth. A symbol of mortality and human frailty, expressed in four-billion-year-old extraterrestrial iron. Fittingly, Downey finds that "spending time with it is oddly humbling". Estimate available on request.

Enquiries: Claudia Florian +1 323 436 5437
claudia.florian@bonhams.com

Vroom with a view

Thomas Vroom first encountered Australian Indigenous art in New York in 1991, igniting a lifelong passion. The hundreds of works he collected over the next two decades went on to form one of Europe's largest, most valuable and significant collections, in the Aboriginal Art Museum in Utrecht. Now repatriated, more than 300 of these works feature in Bonhams single-owner sale of The Thomas Vroom Collection in Sydney on 6 September. When Vroom first saw the work of Emily Kngwarreye (1910-1996) – Australia's most celebrated Indigenous artist – in the 1990s, he famously drove 250km to the artist's community, arriving unannounced, desperate to meet her. Among the auction's 30 works by Emily Kngwarreye is a rare roundel, My Alalgura, with an estimate of AU$10,000 - 15,000). The first circular canvas by the internationally renowned artist ever to have appeared at auction, its tondo form complements the artist's signature use of overlapping dots of color. She developed this style by building upon the Aboriginal technique of precise adjacent marks which emerged in the 1970s. The title refers to the artist's traditional country, located in Utopia, north-east of Alice Springs in the center of Australia.

Enquiries: Merryn Schriever +61 (0) 2 8412 2222
merryn.schriever@bonhams.com

Hope Spinel's Eternal

Spinel stones have been mined in Tajikistan's Kuh-i-Lal ('red mountain') mines since the seventh century – Marco Polo described how the "fine and valuable gems" were dug only for the king, who owned the entire supply. This example, to be sold in the Fine Jewelry sale on 24 September, is one such gem, estimate £150,000 - 200,000.
The jewel, once owned by Louis XIV, was bought by Henry Philip Hope, famous for giving his name to the Hope Diamond in the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D.C. Hope kept the two jewels together, in the 16th drawer of his velvet-lined jewel cabinet. After profligate heirs frittered away the Hope fortune, the collection was sold at auction, and the jewel next emerged in the ownership of Lady Mount Stephen, née Georgiana Tufnell (1864-1933). Gian, as she was known, was the second wife of a Canadian millionaire peer. A former lady-in-waiting to Queen Mary's mother, she once lost a £2,000 necklace on the way to Windsor Castle. She also gave Queen Mary a necklace which Princess Margaret wore on her wedding day. Fitting company for a spinel from the royal mines.

Enquiries: Emily Barber +44 (0) 20 7468 8284
emily.barber@bonhams.com

Hong Kong Dinner

To celebrate the first anniversary of Bonhams' state-of-the-art saleroom in Pacific Place, Bonhams Hong Kong and Cazenove Capital Management held a black tie dinner, the highlights of which were a talk on the Hong Kong art market by Asian art adviser, Catherine Maudsley, as well as a concert by young musicians from the Hong Kong Dulcimer Orchestra. Caroline Wilson, British Consul General to Hong Kong and Macao, was clearly inspired, surprising guests with her own impromptu performance on the yangqin, the Chinese hammered dulcimer. Her Excellency officially opened the saleroom in May 2014.

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