Henry Moore O.M., C.H. (British, 1898-1986) Reclining Figure: One Arm 33 cm. (13 in.) long (including bronze base)

Issue 31, Summer 2012

Editor's letter

There is no doubt about it: summer 2012 is London's moment in the limelight. To join in the celebrations, Bonhams Knightsbridge is holding an Olympic Games sale in July. So if things go wrong in the 100m, there's another way you can get your hands on a gold medal – and in a slightly less stressful fashion.

Being first in the field applies to George Daniels, one of the greatest watchmakers of all time. Despite little education or family support, London-born Daniels taught himself to mend watches and invented the co-axial escapement – one of the great leap forwards in the history of horology. This invention funded his passion for motor cars, and by the end of his life – Daniels died last October – he had assembled a wonderful collection that is on offer in June at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in Sussex. On page 22, Richard Williams writes about Daniels' extraordinary story and how he achieved against the odds.

Bonhams New York is featuring the work of another innovator: Louis Tiffany. At the turn of the century, no American household with any pretension would be without one of his glowing lamps. As Eric Knowles describes on page 40, it was Tiffany's passion for glass that led him to experiment with techniques that blended it together in a molten state to produce subtle shades and textures. It made his company a world-beater.

Bonhams also features another American who tore up the rulebook: Andy Warhol. His image of Queen Elizabeth II – the cover of our Diamond Jubilee issue – is from a series, Reigning Queens. On page 26, Adrian Dannatt writes about how Warhol took the portrait tradition and transformed it through mass media and mass production, and juxtaposed the rare, the rich and the ordinary. In their individual ways, all of these artists were first among equals.
.


Lucinda Bredin

Read more
Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987) Queen Elizabeth II (from Reigning Queens) Screenprint, 1985, a trial proof aside form the edition of 40, on Lennox Museum Board, signed and numbered /30 in pencil lower right, printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York, published by George CP Mulder, Amsterdam, 1000 x 800mm (39 3/8 x 31 1/2in)(SH)

Issue 31, Summer 2012

Editor's letter

There is no doubt about it: summer 2012 is London's moment in the limelight. To join in the celebrations, Bonhams Knightsbridge is holding an Olympic Games sale in July. So if things go wrong in the 100m, there's another way you can get your hands on a gold medal – and in a slightly less stressful fashion.

Being first in the field applies to George Daniels, one of the greatest watchmakers of all time. Despite little education or family support, London-born Daniels taught himself to mend watches and invented the co-axial escapement – one of the great leap forwards in the history of horology. This invention funded his passion for motor cars, and by the end of his life – Daniels died last October – he had assembled a wonderful collection that is on offer in June at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in Sussex. On page 22, Richard Williams writes about Daniels' extraordinary story and how he achieved against the odds.

Bonhams New York is featuring the work of another innovator: Louis Tiffany. At the turn of the century, no American household with any pretension would be without one of his glowing lamps. As Eric Knowles describes on page 40, it was Tiffany's passion for glass that led him to experiment with techniques that blended it together in a molten state to produce subtle shades and textures. It made his company a world-beater.

Bonhams also features another American who tore up the rulebook: Andy Warhol. His image of Queen Elizabeth II – the cover of our Diamond Jubilee issue – is from a series, Reigning Queens. On page 26, Adrian Dannatt writes about how Warhol took the portrait tradition and transformed it through mass media and mass production, and juxtaposed the rare, the rich and the ordinary. In their individual ways, all of these artists were first among equals.
.


Lucinda Bredin

Read more
Zinaida Evgenievna Serebriakova (Russian, 1884-1967) 'Jurisprudence'

Issue 31, Summer 2012

Editor's letter

There is no doubt about it: summer 2012 is London's moment in the limelight. To join in the celebrations, Bonhams Knightsbridge is holding an Olympic Games sale in July. So if things go wrong in the 100m, there's another way you can get your hands on a gold medal – and in a slightly less stressful fashion.

Being first in the field applies to George Daniels, one of the greatest watchmakers of all time. Despite little education or family support, London-born Daniels taught himself to mend watches and invented the co-axial escapement – one of the great leap forwards in the history of horology. This invention funded his passion for motor cars, and by the end of his life – Daniels died last October – he had assembled a wonderful collection that is on offer in June at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in Sussex. On page 22, Richard Williams writes about Daniels' extraordinary story and how he achieved against the odds.

Bonhams New York is featuring the work of another innovator: Louis Tiffany. At the turn of the century, no American household with any pretension would be without one of his glowing lamps. As Eric Knowles describes on page 40, it was Tiffany's passion for glass that led him to experiment with techniques that blended it together in a molten state to produce subtle shades and textures. It made his company a world-beater.

Bonhams also features another American who tore up the rulebook: Andy Warhol. His image of Queen Elizabeth II – the cover of our Diamond Jubilee issue – is from a series, Reigning Queens. On page 26, Adrian Dannatt writes about how Warhol took the portrait tradition and transformed it through mass media and mass production, and juxtaposed the rare, the rich and the ordinary. In their individual ways, all of these artists were first among equals.
.


Lucinda Bredin

Read more
An Important Olympic Archive collection, H.R.(Bobby) Pearce, Champion Sculler (1905-1970)Including Olympic Gold Medals and Diplomas, 1928 & 1932 Olympiads.

Issue 31, Summer 2012

Editor's letter

There is no doubt about it: summer 2012 is London's moment in the limelight. To join in the celebrations, Bonhams Knightsbridge is holding an Olympic Games sale in July. So if things go wrong in the 100m, there's another way you can get your hands on a gold medal – and in a slightly less stressful fashion.

Being first in the field applies to George Daniels, one of the greatest watchmakers of all time. Despite little education or family support, London-born Daniels taught himself to mend watches and invented the co-axial escapement – one of the great leap forwards in the history of horology. This invention funded his passion for motor cars, and by the end of his life – Daniels died last October – he had assembled a wonderful collection that is on offer in June at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in Sussex. On page 22, Richard Williams writes about Daniels' extraordinary story and how he achieved against the odds.

Bonhams New York is featuring the work of another innovator: Louis Tiffany. At the turn of the century, no American household with any pretension would be without one of his glowing lamps. As Eric Knowles describes on page 40, it was Tiffany's passion for glass that led him to experiment with techniques that blended it together in a molten state to produce subtle shades and textures. It made his company a world-beater.

Bonhams also features another American who tore up the rulebook: Andy Warhol. His image of Queen Elizabeth II – the cover of our Diamond Jubilee issue – is from a series, Reigning Queens. On page 26, Adrian Dannatt writes about how Warhol took the portrait tradition and transformed it through mass media and mass production, and juxtaposed the rare, the rich and the ordinary. In their individual ways, all of these artists were first among equals.
.


Lucinda Bredin

Read more
  1. Joan Miró (1893-1983) Femme et oiseau devant le soleil 24 3/8 x 18 ½ inches Executed in 1942
  2. Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987) Queen Elizabeth II (from Reigning Queens) Screenprint, 1985, a trial proof aside form the edition of 40, on Lennox Museum Board, signed and numbered /30 in pencil lower right, printed by Rupert Jasen Smith, New York, published by George CP Mulder, Amsterdam, 1000 x 800mm (39 3/8 x 31 1/2in)(SH)
  3. Henry Moore O.M., C.H. (British, 1898-1986) Reclining Figure: One Arm 33 cm. (13 in.) long (including bronze base)
  4. Walter Osborne (British, 1859-1903) Feeding the chickens
  5. no image
  6. no image
  7. Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson A.R.A. (British, 1889-1946) War in the Air 55.3 x 47 cm. (21 3/4 x 18 1/2 in.)
  8. A Washo basket
  9. Zinaida Evgenievna Serebriakova (Russian, 1884-1967) 'Jurisprudence'
  10. An Important Olympic Archive collection, H.R.(Bobby) Pearce, Champion Sculler (1905-1970)Including Olympic Gold Medals and Diplomas, 1928 & 1932 Olympiads.
  11. no image
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