Issue 36, Autumn 2013

Editor's Letter

Sometimes clichés are true – or at least there is a modicum of fact in the mix. Take the notion of the 'troubled genius'. On occasions, this concept has given license to all sorts of bad behavior – one thinks of Marlowe, Byron, Caravaggio, Gauguin, Hemingway, Iggy Pop... But then there are gifted artists who cause trouble only for themselves – the quiet ones who choose to live their lives in a certain way in order to create masterpieces. L.S. Lowry fits into this category. On page 30, Tom Rosenthal writes about how we may see Lowry as an untrained, confined, eccentric artist. It's true, he did live with his mother and his day job was spent collecting rent. But for Lowry, it was a perfectly acceptable way of living.
The Scottish Colourist, J.D. Fergusson, also had his idiosyncratic ways. According to Chris Brickley, who writes about the painter on page 22, Fergusson had a compulsion to take baths. Even when traveling in the Highlands, he was never without his portable rubber tub. But although this habit was much remarked upon, it doesn't qualify as 'troubled'... it merely puts him in the foothills of OCD in my book. Kitaoji Rosanjin, on the other hand, did cause trouble – to himself and to others. Joe Earle describes how the artist-cum-polymath was abandoned as a child – a tricky start. However, he managed to overcome this handicap by becoming an award-winning calligrapher, a ceramicist of international renown and an exquisitely subtle artist – his lacquered panels, a detail of which is featured on this issue's cover – is being sold in November in Bonhams Fine Japanese Sale. But he wasn't an easy person to rub along with as his six wives would testify. See page 26 to find out more.
We are also featuring an article on a glorious painting by Camille Pissarro – written by the artist's great-grandson, Joachim; some of the rarest American coins and one of the most exciting finds in the world of paleontology.

Do enjoy the issue.

Lucinda Bredin

Read more
The Ex-Scuderia Ferrari, Hans Ruesch, Dick Seaman, Dennis Poore Donington Grand Prix and RAC Hill-Climb Championship-winning,1935-36 ALFA ROMEO  8C-35 Grand Prix Racing Monoposto   Chassis no. 50013   Engine no. 50013

Issue 36, Autumn 2013

Editor's Letter

Sometimes clichés are true – or at least there is a modicum of fact in the mix. Take the notion of the 'troubled genius'. On occasions, this concept has given license to all sorts of bad behavior – one thinks of Marlowe, Byron, Caravaggio, Gauguin, Hemingway, Iggy Pop... But then there are gifted artists who cause trouble only for themselves – the quiet ones who choose to live their lives in a certain way in order to create masterpieces. L.S. Lowry fits into this category. On page 30, Tom Rosenthal writes about how we may see Lowry as an untrained, confined, eccentric artist. It's true, he did live with his mother and his day job was spent collecting rent. But for Lowry, it was a perfectly acceptable way of living.
The Scottish Colourist, J.D. Fergusson, also had his idiosyncratic ways. According to Chris Brickley, who writes about the painter on page 22, Fergusson had a compulsion to take baths. Even when traveling in the Highlands, he was never without his portable rubber tub. But although this habit was much remarked upon, it doesn't qualify as 'troubled'... it merely puts him in the foothills of OCD in my book. Kitaoji Rosanjin, on the other hand, did cause trouble – to himself and to others. Joe Earle describes how the artist-cum-polymath was abandoned as a child – a tricky start. However, he managed to overcome this handicap by becoming an award-winning calligrapher, a ceramicist of international renown and an exquisitely subtle artist – his lacquered panels, a detail of which is featured on this issue's cover – is being sold in November in Bonhams Fine Japanese Sale. But he wasn't an easy person to rub along with as his six wives would testify. See page 26 to find out more.
We are also featuring an article on a glorious painting by Camille Pissarro – written by the artist's great-grandson, Joachim; some of the rarest American coins and one of the most exciting finds in the world of paleontology.

Do enjoy the issue.

Lucinda Bredin

Read more
1880 $4 Stella Coiled Hair Cameo PF-67 NGC

Issue 36, Autumn 2013

Editor's Letter

Sometimes clichés are true – or at least there is a modicum of fact in the mix. Take the notion of the 'troubled genius'. On occasions, this concept has given license to all sorts of bad behavior – one thinks of Marlowe, Byron, Caravaggio, Gauguin, Hemingway, Iggy Pop... But then there are gifted artists who cause trouble only for themselves – the quiet ones who choose to live their lives in a certain way in order to create masterpieces. L.S. Lowry fits into this category. On page 30, Tom Rosenthal writes about how we may see Lowry as an untrained, confined, eccentric artist. It's true, he did live with his mother and his day job was spent collecting rent. But for Lowry, it was a perfectly acceptable way of living.
The Scottish Colourist, J.D. Fergusson, also had his idiosyncratic ways. According to Chris Brickley, who writes about the painter on page 22, Fergusson had a compulsion to take baths. Even when traveling in the Highlands, he was never without his portable rubber tub. But although this habit was much remarked upon, it doesn't qualify as 'troubled'... it merely puts him in the foothills of OCD in my book. Kitaoji Rosanjin, on the other hand, did cause trouble – to himself and to others. Joe Earle describes how the artist-cum-polymath was abandoned as a child – a tricky start. However, he managed to overcome this handicap by becoming an award-winning calligrapher, a ceramicist of international renown and an exquisitely subtle artist – his lacquered panels, a detail of which is featured on this issue's cover – is being sold in November in Bonhams Fine Japanese Sale. But he wasn't an easy person to rub along with as his six wives would testify. See page 26 to find out more.
We are also featuring an article on a glorious painting by Camille Pissarro – written by the artist's great-grandson, Joachim; some of the rarest American coins and one of the most exciting finds in the world of paleontology.

Do enjoy the issue.

Lucinda Bredin

Read more
Clayton Phipps with his 'find'

Issue 36, Autumn 2013

Editor's Letter

Sometimes clichés are true – or at least there is a modicum of fact in the mix. Take the notion of the 'troubled genius'. On occasions, this concept has given license to all sorts of bad behavior – one thinks of Marlowe, Byron, Caravaggio, Gauguin, Hemingway, Iggy Pop... But then there are gifted artists who cause trouble only for themselves – the quiet ones who choose to live their lives in a certain way in order to create masterpieces. L.S. Lowry fits into this category. On page 30, Tom Rosenthal writes about how we may see Lowry as an untrained, confined, eccentric artist. It's true, he did live with his mother and his day job was spent collecting rent. But for Lowry, it was a perfectly acceptable way of living.
The Scottish Colourist, J.D. Fergusson, also had his idiosyncratic ways. According to Chris Brickley, who writes about the painter on page 22, Fergusson had a compulsion to take baths. Even when traveling in the Highlands, he was never without his portable rubber tub. But although this habit was much remarked upon, it doesn't qualify as 'troubled'... it merely puts him in the foothills of OCD in my book. Kitaoji Rosanjin, on the other hand, did cause trouble – to himself and to others. Joe Earle describes how the artist-cum-polymath was abandoned as a child – a tricky start. However, he managed to overcome this handicap by becoming an award-winning calligrapher, a ceramicist of international renown and an exquisitely subtle artist – his lacquered panels, a detail of which is featured on this issue's cover – is being sold in November in Bonhams Fine Japanese Sale. But he wasn't an easy person to rub along with as his six wives would testify. See page 26 to find out more.
We are also featuring an article on a glorious painting by Camille Pissarro – written by the artist's great-grandson, Joachim; some of the rarest American coins and one of the most exciting finds in the world of paleontology.

Do enjoy the issue.

Lucinda Bredin

Read more
  1. Miranda Grant
  2. CAMILLE PISSARRO (1830-1903) Le jardin de Maubuisson, Pontoise, la mère Belette 21 7/16 x 25 7/8 in. (54.5 x 65.7cm) Painted in 1882
  3. John Duncan Fergusson (British, 1874-1961) Souvenir de Saintonge 34.8 x 27 cm. (13 3/4 x 10 5/8 in.)
  4. Kitaoji Rosanjin
  5. The Ex-Scuderia Ferrari, Hans Ruesch, Dick Seaman, Dennis Poore Donington Grand Prix and RAC Hill-Climb Championship-winning,1935-36 ALFA ROMEO  8C-35 Grand Prix Racing Monoposto   Chassis no. 50013   Engine no. 50013
  6. Laurence Stephen Lowry R.A. (British, 1887-1976) The Steps at Wick 43.2 x 53.3 cm. (17 x 21 in.)
  7. A pair of chased brass overlaid teak side chairs<BR />Designed by Lockwood de Forest (1850-1932)<BR />Made in Ahmadebad, India, 1881-1882
  8. Henri Loyrette
  9. Clayton Phipps with his 'find'
  10. 1880 $4 Stella Coiled Hair Cameo PF-67 NGC
  11. Australia's most iconic wine
  12. Museo Frida Kahlo
  13. Philip Treacy OBE

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