Issue 45, Winter 2015

Editor's Letter: Lucinda Bredin "One of the many excitements of putting together each issue of this magazine is the astonishing range of beautiful, curious and unusual items offered for sale at Bonhams. Yet it often strikes me how impromptu themes emerge from forthcoming sales.

In this issue, I was struck by the notion of pioneers. Take the artists, Frederic Remington and Charles Marion Russell. They weren't the first painters to depict the Wild West, but with their vivid illustrations of life on the range – a collection of which is to be offered in New York's American Art Sale in November – they were responsible for propagating enduring myths of the cowboy era. (Did you know that High Noon has been screened at the White House more than any other film? Me neither.) One man who has marinated himself in legends is Larry McMurtry, whose Pulitzer prize-winning Western epic, Lonesome Dove, is a favorite of our Global CEO, Matthew Girling. Turn to page 54 for the real story on the taming of the oh-so-aptly named 'Wild West'.

Another creative pioneer is Andy Warhol. Nowadays, we are so swamped with reproductions and reworked 'found' images, that it is hard sometimes to appreciate how iconoclastic Warhol was. As a celebrated example of his Electric Chair series comes up in the Contemporary Art sale in February, on page 30 Adrian Dannatt examines the artist's grim obsession with death and disaster as a condition of the modern age.

Elsewhere in the magazine, Rachel Spence investigates the ongoing disparity in prices for the work of female artists compared to their male counterparts. Compare the £2 million offered for the most expensive painting by Abstract Expressionist Lee Krasner to the one by her partner, Jackson Pollock, which hammered for £37 million. Read all about it on page 46.

In another field, for the past 70 years the Land Rover has forged a path across the wildest terrains in the remotest areas of the world. As the two millionth Defender is sold for charity by Bonhams, Bear Grylls salutes this most intrepid – and pioneering – of vehicles.
Finally, mention must be made of a pioneer of the kitchen: our own Tom Kemble, Head Chef at Bonhams Restaurant, which has just been awarded a Michelin star – the first for any auction house, anywhere in the world. On page 67, Tom gives us an exclusive recipe from his autumn menu. We hope that you discover works in the magazine that will similarly whet your appetite. Enjoy the issue."

Lucinda Bredin

Read more

Issue 45, Winter 2015

Editor's Letter: Lucinda Bredin "One of the many excitements of putting together each issue of this magazine is the astonishing range of beautiful, curious and unusual items offered for sale at Bonhams. Yet it often strikes me how impromptu themes emerge from forthcoming sales.

In this issue, I was struck by the notion of pioneers. Take the artists, Frederic Remington and Charles Marion Russell. They weren't the first painters to depict the Wild West, but with their vivid illustrations of life on the range – a collection of which is to be offered in New York's American Art Sale in November – they were responsible for propagating enduring myths of the cowboy era. (Did you know that High Noon has been screened at the White House more than any other film? Me neither.) One man who has marinated himself in legends is Larry McMurtry, whose Pulitzer prize-winning Western epic, Lonesome Dove, is a favorite of our Global CEO, Matthew Girling. Turn to page 54 for the real story on the taming of the oh-so-aptly named 'Wild West'.

Another creative pioneer is Andy Warhol. Nowadays, we are so swamped with reproductions and reworked 'found' images, that it is hard sometimes to appreciate how iconoclastic Warhol was. As a celebrated example of his Electric Chair series comes up in the Contemporary Art sale in February, on page 30 Adrian Dannatt examines the artist's grim obsession with death and disaster as a condition of the modern age.

Elsewhere in the magazine, Rachel Spence investigates the ongoing disparity in prices for the work of female artists compared to their male counterparts. Compare the £2 million offered for the most expensive painting by Abstract Expressionist Lee Krasner to the one by her partner, Jackson Pollock, which hammered for £37 million. Read all about it on page 46.

In another field, for the past 70 years the Land Rover has forged a path across the wildest terrains in the remotest areas of the world. As the two millionth Defender is sold for charity by Bonhams, Bear Grylls salutes this most intrepid – and pioneering – of vehicles.
Finally, mention must be made of a pioneer of the kitchen: our own Tom Kemble, Head Chef at Bonhams Restaurant, which has just been awarded a Michelin star – the first for any auction house, anywhere in the world. On page 67, Tom gives us an exclusive recipe from his autumn menu. We hope that you discover works in the magazine that will similarly whet your appetite. Enjoy the issue."

Lucinda Bredin

Read more

Issue 45, Winter 2015

Editor's Letter: Lucinda Bredin "One of the many excitements of putting together each issue of this magazine is the astonishing range of beautiful, curious and unusual items offered for sale at Bonhams. Yet it often strikes me how impromptu themes emerge from forthcoming sales.

In this issue, I was struck by the notion of pioneers. Take the artists, Frederic Remington and Charles Marion Russell. They weren't the first painters to depict the Wild West, but with their vivid illustrations of life on the range – a collection of which is to be offered in New York's American Art Sale in November – they were responsible for propagating enduring myths of the cowboy era. (Did you know that High Noon has been screened at the White House more than any other film? Me neither.) One man who has marinated himself in legends is Larry McMurtry, whose Pulitzer prize-winning Western epic, Lonesome Dove, is a favorite of our Global CEO, Matthew Girling. Turn to page 54 for the real story on the taming of the oh-so-aptly named 'Wild West'.

Another creative pioneer is Andy Warhol. Nowadays, we are so swamped with reproductions and reworked 'found' images, that it is hard sometimes to appreciate how iconoclastic Warhol was. As a celebrated example of his Electric Chair series comes up in the Contemporary Art sale in February, on page 30 Adrian Dannatt examines the artist's grim obsession with death and disaster as a condition of the modern age.

Elsewhere in the magazine, Rachel Spence investigates the ongoing disparity in prices for the work of female artists compared to their male counterparts. Compare the £2 million offered for the most expensive painting by Abstract Expressionist Lee Krasner to the one by her partner, Jackson Pollock, which hammered for £37 million. Read all about it on page 46.

In another field, for the past 70 years the Land Rover has forged a path across the wildest terrains in the remotest areas of the world. As the two millionth Defender is sold for charity by Bonhams, Bear Grylls salutes this most intrepid – and pioneering – of vehicles.
Finally, mention must be made of a pioneer of the kitchen: our own Tom Kemble, Head Chef at Bonhams Restaurant, which has just been awarded a Michelin star – the first for any auction house, anywhere in the world. On page 67, Tom gives us an exclusive recipe from his autumn menu. We hope that you discover works in the magazine that will similarly whet your appetite. Enjoy the issue."

Lucinda Bredin

Read more

Issue 45, Winter 2015

Editor's Letter: Lucinda Bredin "One of the many excitements of putting together each issue of this magazine is the astonishing range of beautiful, curious and unusual items offered for sale at Bonhams. Yet it often strikes me how impromptu themes emerge from forthcoming sales.

In this issue, I was struck by the notion of pioneers. Take the artists, Frederic Remington and Charles Marion Russell. They weren't the first painters to depict the Wild West, but with their vivid illustrations of life on the range – a collection of which is to be offered in New York's American Art Sale in November – they were responsible for propagating enduring myths of the cowboy era. (Did you know that High Noon has been screened at the White House more than any other film? Me neither.) One man who has marinated himself in legends is Larry McMurtry, whose Pulitzer prize-winning Western epic, Lonesome Dove, is a favorite of our Global CEO, Matthew Girling. Turn to page 54 for the real story on the taming of the oh-so-aptly named 'Wild West'.

Another creative pioneer is Andy Warhol. Nowadays, we are so swamped with reproductions and reworked 'found' images, that it is hard sometimes to appreciate how iconoclastic Warhol was. As a celebrated example of his Electric Chair series comes up in the Contemporary Art sale in February, on page 30 Adrian Dannatt examines the artist's grim obsession with death and disaster as a condition of the modern age.

Elsewhere in the magazine, Rachel Spence investigates the ongoing disparity in prices for the work of female artists compared to their male counterparts. Compare the £2 million offered for the most expensive painting by Abstract Expressionist Lee Krasner to the one by her partner, Jackson Pollock, which hammered for £37 million. Read all about it on page 46.

In another field, for the past 70 years the Land Rover has forged a path across the wildest terrains in the remotest areas of the world. As the two millionth Defender is sold for charity by Bonhams, Bear Grylls salutes this most intrepid – and pioneering – of vehicles.
Finally, mention must be made of a pioneer of the kitchen: our own Tom Kemble, Head Chef at Bonhams Restaurant, which has just been awarded a Michelin star – the first for any auction house, anywhere in the world. On page 67, Tom gives us an exclusive recipe from his autumn menu. We hope that you discover works in the magazine that will similarly whet your appetite. Enjoy the issue."

Lucinda Bredin

Read more
  1. Charles Marion Russell (American, 1864-1926) A Shadow Rider 11 x 7in

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