Issue 51, Summer 2017

Editor's Letter: Lucinda Bredin

"When Charlie Thomas brought down the hammer on lot 533 of the Harlech Sale – a 1925 Douglas motorcycle – the room of spectators gave him and the team of auctioneers a standing ovation. It wasn't just because the sale had been an all-day marathon, but because every single lot sold. This accords the auction the rare status of a 'white glove' sale, so-called because tradition dictates that the auctioneer be given a pair of white gloves at its conclusion (rather in the same way a footballer is allowed to take home the match ball for scoring a hat-trick).

The Harlech Sale highlighted what a wonderful spectacle an auction is. Of course, Bonhams has state-of-the-art technology for online bidding – which now accounts for more than 25 per cent of bids – and the bank of specialists engaged in taking telephone instructions grows every year. But auction aficionados will say that being in the room – if you can – is not an old-school affectation: from a privileged seat in the stalls you can take the temperature of a sale, reading the atmosphere, where the next bid will come from and how much it will be.

It's enormous fun. In fact, there are moments in the saleroom that I put on the same level as memorable nights at the theater. This March, Dalí's portrait of his sister Ana María, which we featured in the previous issue of Bonhams Magazine, came up for auction. The room was bursting, and a cacophony of excited bidding came down the telephones, in every known language. The bidding between the phones began at a lick and continued that way until the painting was knocked down at £1.8 million to the Dalí Foundation, double the estimate. Cheers broke out throughout the room.

Other memorable moments this season have been our Global CEO, Matthew Girling, presiding over a saleroom tussle for a dazzling diamond ring, James Knight bringing down the hammer on a 1966 Ferrari 330GT – a motor that every person in the tent seemed determined to drive home – and Ralph Taylor making a world-record for a sculpture by Saloua Choucair, sold for £275,000 – more than 10 times its estimate. If that's not drama, I don't know what is.

This season our international salerooms are poised to bring you more theater: a Sidney Nolan painting to be offered in Sydney; the Easter Rising surrender signed by Patrick Pearse; a newly discovered drawing by the Renaissance master Parmigianino, and a Rolls-Royce that once belonged to the Maharana of Udaipur."

Lucinda Bredin

Read more

Issue 51, Summer 2017

Editor's Letter: Lucinda Bredin

"When Charlie Thomas brought down the hammer on lot 533 of the Harlech Sale – a 1925 Douglas motorcycle – the room of spectators gave him and the team of auctioneers a standing ovation. It wasn't just because the sale had been an all-day marathon, but because every single lot sold. This accords the auction the rare status of a 'white glove' sale, so-called because tradition dictates that the auctioneer be given a pair of white gloves at its conclusion (rather in the same way a footballer is allowed to take home the match ball for scoring a hat-trick).

The Harlech Sale highlighted what a wonderful spectacle an auction is. Of course, Bonhams has state-of-the-art technology for online bidding – which now accounts for more than 25 per cent of bids – and the bank of specialists engaged in taking telephone instructions grows every year. But auction aficionados will say that being in the room – if you can – is not an old-school affectation: from a privileged seat in the stalls you can take the temperature of a sale, reading the atmosphere, where the next bid will come from and how much it will be.

It's enormous fun. In fact, there are moments in the saleroom that I put on the same level as memorable nights at the theater. This March, Dalí's portrait of his sister Ana María, which we featured in the previous issue of Bonhams Magazine, came up for auction. The room was bursting, and a cacophony of excited bidding came down the telephones, in every known language. The bidding between the phones began at a lick and continued that way until the painting was knocked down at £1.8 million to the Dalí Foundation, double the estimate. Cheers broke out throughout the room.

Other memorable moments this season have been our Global CEO, Matthew Girling, presiding over a saleroom tussle for a dazzling diamond ring, James Knight bringing down the hammer on a 1966 Ferrari 330GT – a motor that every person in the tent seemed determined to drive home – and Ralph Taylor making a world-record for a sculpture by Saloua Choucair, sold for £275,000 – more than 10 times its estimate. If that's not drama, I don't know what is.

This season our international salerooms are poised to bring you more theater: a Sidney Nolan painting to be offered in Sydney; the Easter Rising surrender signed by Patrick Pearse; a newly discovered drawing by the Renaissance master Parmigianino, and a Rolls-Royce that once belonged to the Maharana of Udaipur."

Lucinda Bredin

Read more
IRELAND –  PATRICK PEARSE & THE EASTER RISING The Order of Surrender, typed and signed ("P. H. Pearse") and dated ("29th April 1916/ 3.45 p.m.")

Issue 51, Summer 2017

Editor's Letter: Lucinda Bredin

"When Charlie Thomas brought down the hammer on lot 533 of the Harlech Sale – a 1925 Douglas motorcycle – the room of spectators gave him and the team of auctioneers a standing ovation. It wasn't just because the sale had been an all-day marathon, but because every single lot sold. This accords the auction the rare status of a 'white glove' sale, so-called because tradition dictates that the auctioneer be given a pair of white gloves at its conclusion (rather in the same way a footballer is allowed to take home the match ball for scoring a hat-trick).

The Harlech Sale highlighted what a wonderful spectacle an auction is. Of course, Bonhams has state-of-the-art technology for online bidding – which now accounts for more than 25 per cent of bids – and the bank of specialists engaged in taking telephone instructions grows every year. But auction aficionados will say that being in the room – if you can – is not an old-school affectation: from a privileged seat in the stalls you can take the temperature of a sale, reading the atmosphere, where the next bid will come from and how much it will be.

It's enormous fun. In fact, there are moments in the saleroom that I put on the same level as memorable nights at the theater. This March, Dalí's portrait of his sister Ana María, which we featured in the previous issue of Bonhams Magazine, came up for auction. The room was bursting, and a cacophony of excited bidding came down the telephones, in every known language. The bidding between the phones began at a lick and continued that way until the painting was knocked down at £1.8 million to the Dalí Foundation, double the estimate. Cheers broke out throughout the room.

Other memorable moments this season have been our Global CEO, Matthew Girling, presiding over a saleroom tussle for a dazzling diamond ring, James Knight bringing down the hammer on a 1966 Ferrari 330GT – a motor that every person in the tent seemed determined to drive home – and Ralph Taylor making a world-record for a sculpture by Saloua Choucair, sold for £275,000 – more than 10 times its estimate. If that's not drama, I don't know what is.

This season our international salerooms are poised to bring you more theater: a Sidney Nolan painting to be offered in Sydney; the Easter Rising surrender signed by Patrick Pearse; a newly discovered drawing by the Renaissance master Parmigianino, and a Rolls-Royce that once belonged to the Maharana of Udaipur."

Lucinda Bredin

Read more

Issue 51, Summer 2017

Editor's Letter: Lucinda Bredin

"When Charlie Thomas brought down the hammer on lot 533 of the Harlech Sale – a 1925 Douglas motorcycle – the room of spectators gave him and the team of auctioneers a standing ovation. It wasn't just because the sale had been an all-day marathon, but because every single lot sold. This accords the auction the rare status of a 'white glove' sale, so-called because tradition dictates that the auctioneer be given a pair of white gloves at its conclusion (rather in the same way a footballer is allowed to take home the match ball for scoring a hat-trick).

The Harlech Sale highlighted what a wonderful spectacle an auction is. Of course, Bonhams has state-of-the-art technology for online bidding – which now accounts for more than 25 per cent of bids – and the bank of specialists engaged in taking telephone instructions grows every year. But auction aficionados will say that being in the room – if you can – is not an old-school affectation: from a privileged seat in the stalls you can take the temperature of a sale, reading the atmosphere, where the next bid will come from and how much it will be.

It's enormous fun. In fact, there are moments in the saleroom that I put on the same level as memorable nights at the theater. This March, Dalí's portrait of his sister Ana María, which we featured in the previous issue of Bonhams Magazine, came up for auction. The room was bursting, and a cacophony of excited bidding came down the telephones, in every known language. The bidding between the phones began at a lick and continued that way until the painting was knocked down at £1.8 million to the Dalí Foundation, double the estimate. Cheers broke out throughout the room.

Other memorable moments this season have been our Global CEO, Matthew Girling, presiding over a saleroom tussle for a dazzling diamond ring, James Knight bringing down the hammer on a 1966 Ferrari 330GT – a motor that every person in the tent seemed determined to drive home – and Ralph Taylor making a world-record for a sculpture by Saloua Choucair, sold for £275,000 – more than 10 times its estimate. If that's not drama, I don't know what is.

This season our international salerooms are poised to bring you more theater: a Sidney Nolan painting to be offered in Sydney; the Easter Rising surrender signed by Patrick Pearse; a newly discovered drawing by the Renaissance master Parmigianino, and a Rolls-Royce that once belonged to the Maharana of Udaipur."

Lucinda Bredin

Read more
  1. Marc Chagall (Russian/French, 1887-1985) Le Cirque The portfolio, comprising the complete set of 38 lithographs (23 in colours and 15 in black), 1957, on Arches wove paper, in- and hors-texte, with title page and justification, text in French, signed in pencil on the justification, copy number 197 of 250, published by Tériade Editeur, Paris, the full sheets, loose (as issued), the colours very fresh and vibrant, in very good condition, within original paper wrapper with title and cream cloth-covered portfolio with gilt lettering on the spine and matching slipcaseOverall 451 x 343mm.
  2. 'The Rolls from Rajputana' Formerly the property of His Highness the Maharana Sir Fateh Singh Bahadur of Udaipur, G.C.S.I. (1849-1930),1914 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Silver Ghost Open Tourer  Chassis no. 64 AB
  3. Dmitrii Semenovich Stelletsky (Russian, 1875-1947) 'The Fox Hunt'
  4. Sidney Nolan (1917-1992) Ned Kelly, 1966
  5. IRELAND –  PATRICK PEARSE & THE EASTER RISING The Order of Surrender, typed and signed ("P. H. Pearse") and dated ("29th April 1916/ 3.45 p.m.")
  6. Girolamo Francesco Mazzola, called il Parmigianino (Parma 1503-1540 Casal Maggiore) Three studies of a nude female figure unframed
  7. Lee Ufan B. 1936 , 李禹煥 From Point

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